Nicola Nymalm

Nicola Nymalm

Research Fellow

Nicola Nymalm is a research fellow at UI's Asia and Global Politics and Security programmes. In her current project she focuses on comparing U.S. responses to the economic rise of China to those to the earlier rise of Japan. Her research interests include US-Chinese and US-Japanese relations, encounters between established and emerging powers, international relations theories, cultural political economy, philosophy of science, and qualitative/ interpretive methodologies and methods, such as discourse theory and analysis.

Nicola Nymalm received her Ph.D in Political Science/International Relations from Kiel University in Germany in July 2015. She was also a member of the doctoral program at the GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies in Hamburg. Her dissertation project was funded by the Finnish Cultural Foundation (SKR) in Helsinki. Nicola holds an M.A. in Contemporary history, Chinese studies and European law from the Humboldt University and Free University in Berlin, and a Master of Peace and Security Studies (M.P.S.) from the University of Hamburg. 

Her work has been published in Journal of International Relations and Development, International Political Sociology, International Studies Review and Asian Perspective.

Areas of expertise:

International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, Rising Powers, US-China relations

Publications (select)

(2018) with Johannes Plagemann Comparative Exceptionalism: Universality and Particularity in Foreign Policy Discourses, in International Studies Review, online first

(2017) The Economics of Identity: is China the new ‘Japan Problem’ for the United States?, in: Journal of International Relations and Development, online first

(2014) with Godehardt, Nadine, The Impact of Post-2014 Afghanistan on Asian Regional Security, Introduction to Special Issue, in: Godehardt, Nadine and Nicola Nymalm (eds.), The Impact of Post-2014 Afghanistan on Asian Regional Security, Asian Perspective Vol. 38 No. 4 Oct.–Dec. 2014, 493-495 

(2013) The End of the 'Liberal Theory of History'? Dissecting the U.S. Congress’ Discourse on China's Currency Policy, in: International Political Sociology, 7, 4, 388–405

Varukorg

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